28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (2023)

Table of Contents
1. Black History Month began as Negro History Week in 1926. 2. The first federally-recognized Black History Month was observed in 1976. 3. Black History Month is in February for a reason. 4. Black History Month has a theme every year — here’s the 2022 theme. 5. You can attend the 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival. 6. Rosa Parks did not give up her bus seat because she was “tired.” 7. Claudette Colvin did the same thing as Rosa Parks — nine months sooner. 8. Martin Luther King Jr. fought for environmental justice. 9. Martin Luther King Jr. had a secretary, Maude Ballou. 10. Maude Ballou risked her life to protect MLK Jr. 11. Ruby Bridges, known for desegregating schools in the South, is only 67 today. 12. Madam C.J. Walker was the first African-American woman to become a self-made millionaire. 13. Harriet Tubman rescued about 70 enslaved people, including her family. 14. Maya Angelou is the first Black woman to appear on the quarter. 15. Ella Fitzgerald was the first Black Grammy winner. 16. Stevie Wonder was the first Black musician to take home the Grammy for Album of the Year. 17. Kamala Harris became the first Black VP. 18. Juneteenth was only federally recognized in 2021. 19. Jackie Robinson was the first Black player for Major League Baseball. 20. Many thought Satchel Paige would be the MLB’s first Black baseball player. 21. Frederick Douglass was the “most photographed” American in the 1800s. 22. George Washington Carver did not actually invent peanut butter. 23. The NAACP was founded in 1909. 24. Hattie McDaniel made history as the first Black Oscar winner. 25. Beyoncé set a major Grammy record in 2021. 26. Langston Hughes led the Harlem Renaissance with his poetry. 27. Oprah Winfrey became the first Black woman billionaire. 28. President Biden is about to appoint the first Black woman to the Supreme Court. FAQs Videos

Every year, the U.S. and Canada observe Black History Month throughout February, to honor the incredible Black activists, abolitionists, and leaders who have shaped history. So, for those who would like to learn more about just a handful of the people, events, and stories that Black History Month (aka African American History Month) celebrates, here are 28 Black History Month facts for each day of February 2022.

Parents, guardians, and teachers, feel free to pull this article up each day to read another fact to your children or students.

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1. Black History Month began as Negro History Week in 1926.

In 1926, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, aka ASALH), organized the first national Negro History Week; about 40 years later, in the late 1960s, the holiday had developed into Black History Month, which was observed on many college campuses, as per History.

2. The first federally-recognized Black History Month was observed in 1976.

For years, ASALH campaigned for the federal government to acknowledge Black History Month. Come 1976, President Gerald Ford finally deemed Black History Month a public holiday, and every U.S. POTUS since then has recognized it, too.

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3. Black History Month is in February for a reason.

28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (1)

Source: MPI/Getty Images

According to ASALH, the organization’s founder Dr. Carter G. Woodson chose to hold the first Negro History Week during the second week of February because that’s when both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were born.

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4. Black History Month has a theme every year — here’s the 2022 theme.

Every year since 1928, Black History Month and Negro History Week have had a theme. The 2022 theme of Black History Month is Black Health and Wellness, and aims to appreciate scholars, medical practitioners, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, and other medical and wellness workers in the African Diaspora.

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5. You can attend the 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival.

ASALH is hosting a number of events as part of the 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival throughout the month of February. The two main talks are: Exploitation in Medicine on Feb. 12, and Race Norming in the NFL on Feb. 27. You can buy tickets here.

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6. Rosa Parks did not give up her bus seat because she was “tired.”

Rosa Parks is known for breaking Montgomery, Ala.’s segregation laws by refusing to concede her bus seat to a white man, for which she was arrested. Some reports of the famous incident claim that Parks only did this because she was “tired” — but Parks herself clarified, “The only tired I was, was tired of giving in,” as per the Smithsonian. Parks was a legendary civil rights activist, and it’s inaccurate to reduce her act of resistance to just being tired, which simply wasn’t the truth.

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7. Claudette Colvin did the same thing as Rosa Parks — nine months sooner.

28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (2)

Source: Getty Images for Tory Burch Foundation

Claudette Colvin speaks onstage during the 2020 Embrace Ambition Summit by the Tory Burch Foundation at Jazz at Lincoln Center on March 5, 2020 in New York City.

Nine months before Parks took a stand on a Montgomery bus, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin did the same thing, in the same city, and she was arrested for it, too. According to NPR, Colvin was the first Black person “to really challenge the law.” However, both Parks and Colvin were members of the NAACP, and the organization chose to instead use Parks as the symbol of the Montgomery bus boycott, for a number of reasons. Colvin is still alive, at 82 years of age.

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8. Martin Luther King Jr. fought for environmental justice.

On the night before he was assassinated, Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at a protest as part of the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike, in support of the Black sanitation workers who were protesting their hazardous and polluted working conditions — a fight that shows the link between environmental and racial justice.

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9. Martin Luther King Jr. had a secretary, Maude Ballou.

For several years, the late Maude Ballou served as a loyal secretary to Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, and later Atlanta. For her job, she managed King’s schedule, responded to letters for him, coordinated carpools during the bus boycott, and traveled with King and his family.

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10. Maude Ballou risked her life to protect MLK Jr.

According to the Chicago Tribune, due to her job, Maude Ballou was once No. 21 on a list of “persons and churches most vulnerable to violent attacks” compiled by the Montgomery Improvement Association. In her 2015 interview with the Tribune, she expressed that she was aware of the risks of her job, and had even seen the KKK watching her through her office window — but she didn’t worry too much, as she was a self-identified “daredevil.”

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11. Ruby Bridges, known for desegregating schools in the South, is only 67 today.

28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (3)

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Source: Getty Images for Glamour

Ruby Bridges speaks onstage at Glamour's 2017 Women of The Year Awards at Kings Theatre on November 13, 2017 in Brooklyn, New York.

In 1960, Ruby Bridges became the first Black student to go to an otherwise all-white elementary school in the South. She made history that day, and she’s still alive today, at 67 years old.

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12. Madam C.J. Walker was the first African-American woman to become a self-made millionaire.

Madam C.J. Walker revolutionized the hair care industry with the plethora of products she created for Black hair, including products and tools to straighten kinky hair, as per PBS. Thanks to her creations, she became the first African-American woman to become a self-made millionaire, and Octavia Spencer played her in the Netflix drama Self-Made about Madam C.J. Walker’s amazing life.

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13. Harriet Tubman rescued about 70 enslaved people, including her family.

The incredible Harriet Tubman is best known for rescuing enslaved people via the Underground Railroad. After making her own escape from Maryland, where she had been enslaved for her entire life, she returned to rescue her family and friends, and ultimately, a total of 70 people, as per Britannica. Cynthia Erivo recently portrayed Tubman in the film Harriet.

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In January 2022, the U.S. Mint revealed that Maya Angelou is the newest person featured on the U.S. quarter, making her the first Black woman to appear on the coin. The writer, poet, and activist passed away in 2014, after a long life of creating art, fighting for civil rights with Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, and so much more.

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15. Ella Fitzgerald was the first Black Grammy winner.

In 1958, singer Ella Fitzgerald took home two Grammys, making her the first Black musical artist to win the coveted prize. She won one for Best Jazz Performance on “Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Songbook,” and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for “Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Irving Berlin Songbook,” as per The Drop.

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16. Stevie Wonder was the first Black musician to take home the Grammy for Album of the Year.

28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (4)

Source: Getty Images

According to Oprah Daily, in 1973, Stevie Wonder became the first Black musician to win the Grammy for Album of the Year, one of the biggest awards of the night. He won for his album “Innervisions.” In total, Wonder has amassed 74 nominations and 25 wins at the Grammys.

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17. Kamala Harris became the first Black VP.

In 2021, Vice President Kamala Harris made history when she was sworn in as vice president, as she became the first woman, Black American, and South Asian American to be elected into the role.

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18. Juneteenth was only federally recognized in 2021.

Black History Month and Martin Luther King Jr. Day are far from the only holidays that celebrate Black history in the U.S. Every June 19th, African Americans observe Juneteenth, which honors the day enslaved people were finally emancipated in 1865 in the U.S., as per History. The holiday only became federally recognized in 2021.

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19. Jackie Robinson was the first Black player for Major League Baseball.

After decades of segregation between Major League Baseball and the Negro Leagues, the Jackie Robinson made history when the he was chosen as the Brooklyn Dodgers’ first Black baseball player in 1947, therefore integrating the MLB, as per Biography. He played in the MLB for 10 years, and is a legend in the sport.

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20. Many thought Satchel Paige would be the MLB’s first Black baseball player.

At the time, many thought Negro Leagues baseball player and pitcher Satchel Paige would be the one to integrate the MLB, as per Sportscasting. About a year after Robinson joined the Dodgers, Satchel Paige joined the Cleveland Indians, helping to further integrate the MLB.

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21. Frederick Douglass was the “most photographed” American in the 1800s.

According to the NPCA, the legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass was the most photographed American in the 1800s — and that was no accident. The organization explains that Douglass purposely sat for photos often, as he wanted to spread a more accurate image of African Americans at the time; he also intentionally kept a straight face in photos, to challenge the idea that Black people were ever happy to be enslaved.

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22. George Washington Carver did not actually invent peanut butter.

During George Washington Carver’s lifetime, he invented and discovered more than 300 ways to use peanuts. However, contrary to what many people think, Carver did not actually invent peanut butter, according to the National Peanut Board.

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23. The NAACP was founded in 1909.

In 1909, several dozen activists of various races came together in New York City to form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, known as the NAACP, in response to violence against Black people across the U.S. Some of the African American founding members were W. E. B. Du Bois, Mary Church Terrell, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett.

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24. Hattie McDaniel made history as the first Black Oscar winner.

In 1939, actress Hattie McDaniel became the first Black performer to win an Academy Award, which she won for her role as Mammy in the classic film Gone With the Wind.

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25. Beyoncé set a major Grammy record in 2021.

28 Facts About Black History and Changemakers, From Beyoncé to Frederick Douglass (6)

Source: Getty Images for The Recording Academy

At the 2021 Grammy Awards, Beyoncé won her 28th Grammy, meaning she has won the most Grammys of any singer in history, and of any woman in history. She is currently tied with Quincy Jones for most total Grammys of all time.

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26. Langston Hughes led the Harlem Renaissance with his poetry.

In the 1920s, poet Langston Hughes led the way with his revolutionary poems, essays, books, and other works, many of which focused on “honestly” depicting life for Black people in the U.S. at the time, as per the Poetry Foundation. Some of his most iconic poems include “Harlem” and “I, Too.”

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27. Oprah Winfrey became the first Black woman billionaire.

In 2003, after decades of hard work in the entertainment industry, Oprah Winfrey was crowned the first Black woman to become a self-made billionaire, as per Business Insider.

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28. President Biden is about to appoint the first Black woman to the Supreme Court.

Every moment we live through is history in the making. In January 2022, Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer announced his retirement. Biden promptly replied that he intended to replace Breyer with “the first Black woman nominated to the United States Supreme Court.”

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FAQs

What are 5 Black history facts? ›

34 Facts About Black History That You Might Not Know
  • Rebecca Lee Crumpler was the first Black woman to become a doctor of medicine in the United States. ...
  • The Sugarhill Gang's “Rapper's Delight” became the first commercially successful rap record. ...
  • The practice of vaccinations was brought to America by a slave.
31 Jan 2019

What are 2 facts about Black history? ›

Black History Month Trivia

William Tucker, son of indentured servants from Great Britain, was the first recorded African child to be born in the colonies in 1624. Vermont was the first colony to ban slavery in 1777. In the 1770s, a Quaker named Anthony Benezet created the first school for African American children.

Who was the first Black History Month president? ›

President Reagan issued Presidential Proclamation 5443 , which proclaimed that “the foremost purpose of Black History Month is to make all Americans aware of this struggle for freedom and equal opportunity.” This proclamation stated further that this month was a time “to celebrate the many achievements of African ...

What are 3 famous African American? ›

Famous African Americans
  • Benjamin Banneker. Born on November 9, 1731 near Elliott City Maryland, Benjamin was one of America's greatest intellectuals and scientists. ...
  • Dr. Percy Lavon Julian. ...
  • Jesse Owens. ...
  • Fannie Lou Hamer. ...
  • Sojourner Truth. ...
  • Ruby Bridges Hall. ...
  • Thurgood Marshall. ...
  • Booker T.

What are 10 random facts? ›

  • "OMG" usage can be traced back to 1917. ...
  • The majority of your brain is fat. ...
  • Stop signs used to be yellow. ...
  • Most wasabi we eat in the U.S. isn't really wasabi. ...
  • Green Eggs and Ham started as a bet. ...
  • Too much water can kill you. ...
  • You might be drinking water that is older than the solar system.

Did you know facts about history? ›

Fun History Facts
  • During World War II, a Great Dane named Juliana was awarded the Blue Cross Medal. ...
  • Alexander the Great was accidentally buried alive. ...
  • There were female Gladiators in Ancient Rome! ...
  • The world's most successful pirate in history was a lady named Ching Shih.
10 Oct 2020

Who was the first Black person to vote? ›

When the school opened for classes in 1871, 378 students enrolled and Peterson became its first custodian. To honor Thomas Mundy Peterson as the first African-American voter after the passage of the 15th Amendment, the citizens of Perth Amboy raised $70 ($2100 in 2021 dollars) to award him with a gold medal.

Who started Black history? ›

It was Carter G. Woodson, the "father of Black history," who first set out in 1926 to designate a time to promote and educate people about Black history and culture, according to W. Marvin Dulaney.

Who was the first Black history person? ›

He was one of the first scholars to study the history of the African diaspora, including African-American history. A founder of The Journal of Negro History in 1916, Woodson has been called the "father of black history".
...
Carter G. Woodson
OccupationHistorian, author, journalist
6 more rows

Who are famous Black slaves? ›

Black Abolitionists
William Wells BrownPaul CuffeeFrederick Douglass
Henry Highland GarnetLeonard GrimesFrances Ellen Watkins Harper
Josiah HensonPaul JenningsRobert Morris
Solomon NorthupOberlin Wellington RescuersSarah Parker Remond
Mary Ann ShaddWilliam StillHarriet Tubman

Who fought for Black rights? ›

Thurgood Marshall
  • Julian Bond.
  • Medgar Evers.
  • Charles Hamilton Houston.
  • James Weldon Johnson.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Oscar Micheaux.
  • Harry T. and Hariette Moore.
  • Mary White Ovington.

Who were the 7 Black heroes of the American Revolution? ›

7 Examples of Black Heroism During the American Revolution
  • Crispus Attucks: Patriot Martyr.
  • Phyllis Wheatley (also Phillis and Wheatly): Patriot and Abolition Poet.
  • Salem Poor: Patriot Soldier and Bunker Hill Hero.
  • Peter Salem: Patriot Soldier and Bunker Hill Hero.
  • James Armistead Lafayette: Double Agent.
4 Jul 2020

Who is a Black hero? ›

When it comes to pioneers in African American history, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, and Muhammad Ali are often mentioned—and rightfully so. But what do you know about other Black history heroes like Claudette Colvin, Alice Coachman, or Shirley Chisholm?

When did slavery end in the US? ›

Passed by Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified on December 6, 1865, the 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States and provides that "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or ...

Who has the most impact on Black history? ›

Their Greatest Achievements
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. One of the most well-known civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, Jr. ...
  • Rosa Parks. ...
  • Barack Obama. ...
  • Frederick Douglass. ...
  • oprah Winfrey. ...
  • Harriet Tubman. ...
  • Medgar Evers. ...
  • Jackie Robinson.
2 Mar 2022

What are 50 fun facts? ›

50 Absurd Facts That Will Make You Question Everything
  • You typically only breathe out of one nostril at a time. ...
  • "Vegetables" don't really exist. ...
  • More people drown in fresh water than in salt water. ...
  • Your brain uses up around 20 percent of your body's blood and oxygen. ...
  • Ravens' moods are affected by others.

Did you know facts for 7 year olds? ›

Your eyes blink all day long to keep them clean. Each of your hands has 14 finger bones. After about age 30, people start shrinking – they get a bit shorter every year. People can go without drinking water for as long as a week without dying.

What are 5 weird facts? ›

65 Facts So Weird You Won't Believe They're True
  • There's a company that turns dead bodies into an ocean reef. ...
  • The name "bonobo" resulted from a misspelling. ...
  • There is an annual Coffee Break Festival. ...
  • You can buy a flying bicycle. ...
  • Dolphins sleep with one eye open. ...
  • Vacuum cleaners were originally horse-drawn.
24 Mar 2021

Did you know facts for 5 year olds? ›

Amazing you
  • In your whole life, your mouth will make about 10,000 gallons of spit. That's enough to fill a giant swimming pool.
  • Babies have more bones than grown-ups. You're born with about 300 bones, but when you're grown up you end up with around 260. ...
  • Every person on earth has a different fingerprint.

Did you know facts for 12 year olds? ›

Fun Facts and Trivia
  • It is impossible for most people to lick their own elbow. ...
  • A crocodile cannot stick its tongue out.
  • A shrimp's heart is in its head.
  • It is physically impossible for pigs to look up into the sky.

What is history 10 point? ›

Past events, as well as the recall, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of these events, are all included under the general word "history."

What is history write 10 lines about history? ›

Explanation: History is the study of past events. People know what happened in the past by looking at things from the past including sources (like books, newspapers, and letters) and artifacts (like pottery, tools, and human or animal remains.)

Who was the first Black teacher? ›

Susie King Taylor (1848-1912) was considered to be the first Black teacher in America because she taught freed African-American slaves in a freedom school in Georgia.

When were Black men allowed to vote? ›

Passed by Congress February 26, 1869, and ratified February 3, 1870, the 15th Amendment granted African American men the right to vote.

Who gave slaves the right to vote? ›

The Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution (1868) granted African Americans the rights of citizenship. However, this did not always translate into the ability to vote. Black voters were systematically turned away from state polling places. To combat this problem, Congress passed the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870.

Who is the richest Black? ›

For the eleventh time in a row, Aliko Dangote (b. 1957) has been named the richest man in Africa in 2022, with an estimated net worth of around $13 billion. 1 He is also the richest black man in the world.

What is Black history called? ›

Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by African Americans and a time for recognizing their central role in U.S. history. Also known as African American History Month, the event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Carter G.

How old is Black history? ›

United States: Black History Month (1970)

Black History Month was first proposed by Black educators and the Black United Students at Kent State University in February 1969. The first celebration of Black History Month took place at Kent State a year later, from January 2 to February 28, 1970.

Who was the first Black billionaire? ›

He became the first African-American billionaire in 2001. Johnson's companies have counted among the most prominent African-American businesses in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
...
Robert L. Johnson
BornRobert Louis Johnson April 8, 1946 Hickory, Mississippi, U.S.
6 more rows

Who was the first Black millionaire? ›

Madam C.J.

Walker (1867-1919), who started life as a Louisiana sharecropper born to formerly enslaved parents in 1867, is usually cited as the first Black millionaire.

When did Black history begin? ›

African-American history began with the arrival of Africans to North America in the 16th and 17th centuries. Former Spanish slaves who had been freed by Francis Drake arrived aboard the Golden Hind at New Albion in California in 1579.

What are some Black historical events? ›

African American HistoryEvents
  • The St. Augustine Movement (1963-1964) ...
  • Biloxi Wade-Ins (1959-1963) ...
  • Detroit Walk To Freedom (1963) ...
  • William Reynolds v. ...
  • The Watts Truce (1992) ...
  • Overtown-Liberty City (Miami) Riot (1989) ...
  • James Meredith's March Against Fear (1966) ...
  • African Americans in the California Gold Rush (1848-1860)

What are the 4 major movements of African American History? ›

And after the war, the racist legacy of slavery would persist, spurring movements of resistance, including the Underground Railroad, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma to Montgomery March, and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Did you know facts about African history? ›

100 things that you did not know about Africa
  • The human race is of African origin. ...
  • Skeletons of pre-humans have been found in Africa that date back between 4 and 5 million years. ...
  • Africans were the first to organise fishing expeditions 90,000 years ago. ...
  • Africans were the first to engage in mining 43,000 years ago.

How long did slavery last in years? ›

The legal institution of human chattel slavery, comprising the enslavement primarily of Africans and African Americans, was prevalent in the United States of America from its founding in 1776 until 1865, predominantly in the South.

What is Black history called now? ›

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States, where it is also known as African-American History Month. It has received official recognition from governments in the United States and Canada, and more recently has been observed in Ireland, and the United Kingdom.

What were 3 goals of the Black Power movement? ›

Black Power began as revolutionary movement in the 1960s and 1970s. It emphasized racial pride, economic empowerment, and the creation of political and cultural institutions.

What were 3 key elements in the lives of African Americans after they gained their freedom? ›

The black family, the black church, and education were central elements in the lives of post-emancipation African Americans. Many African Americans lived in desperate rural poverty across the South in the decades following the Civil War.

What is a fancy word for black? ›

1 dark, dusky; sooty, inky; sable, ebony.

What is black in Old English? ›

Thus, Old English has two forms for black: blac and blaec. Although Old English has two forms for black, blac is the form that appears most frequently in Old English literature.

How did Black history begin? ›

The story of Black History Month begins in Chicago during the summer of 1915. An alumnus of the University of Chicago with many friends in the city, Carter G. Woodson traveled from Washington, D.C. to participate in a national celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation sponsored by the state of Illinois.

What are 20 facts about Africa? ›

27 Surprising Facts About Africa
  • There are 54 Countries in Africa. ...
  • Africa Covers 30 Million Square Kilometres. ...
  • The Most Widely Spoken Language is Arabic. ...
  • There are More than 2,000 Recognised Languages. ...
  • Illiteracy is as High as 40% Across the Continent. ...
  • Africa is the World's Hottest Continent.

What are 3 historical facts? ›

Fun History Facts
  • During World War II, a Great Dane named Juliana was awarded the Blue Cross Medal. ...
  • Alexander the Great was accidentally buried alive. ...
  • There were female Gladiators in Ancient Rome! ...
  • The world's most successful pirate in history was a lady named Ching Shih.
10 Oct 2020

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